NURS 6551 Week 1 Discussion: Political, Social, and Sociocultural Influences on Women’s Health – Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) Essay

NURS 6551 Week 1 Discussion: Political, Social, and Sociocultural Influences on Women’s Health – Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) Essay

Human Papilloma Virus

Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) is transmitted through close intimate contact with another individual carrying the disease and is known as the most common sexually transmitted disease according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). (CDC, 2016).  Unfortunately, this condition can remain asymptomatic permitting the spread of the virus to others (Shuiling & Likis, 2017).  The virus is transmitted via sexual intercourse with a person having infected genitals, oropharynx, as well as anal.  HPV  is found during routine screening with Papanicolaou (PAP) smear which determines abnormal cells present to the cervix (CDC, 2016).  These abnormal cells frequently return to normal over a period of time, however, with some persons these cells may turn into cancer (CDC, 2016).  Unresolved lesions can lead to cancer of the cervix, vagina, penis, anus, and the oropharynx (Sasaki et al., 2017).  Nearly…

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NURS 6551 Week 1 Discussion: Political, Social, and Sociocultural Influences on Women’s Health – Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) Essay

NURS 6551 Week 1 Discussion – As an advanced practice nurse, you must remain current on health issues that commonly impact women such as birth control, abortion, family planning, the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Many of these women’s health issues are heavily influenced by political, social, and sociocultural factors. These influences might not only affect a woman’s ability or desire to receive care, but also a provider’s ability or willingness to offer care. How might political, social, and sociocultural factors influence your personal perceptions of these women’s health issues? NURS 6551 Week 1 Discussion: Political, Social, and Sociocultural Influences on Women’s Health – Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) Essay

To prepare FOR NURS 6551 Week 1 Discussion:

  •   Review this week’s media presentation, as well as Chapter 1 of the Schuiling and Likis text.
  • Select and research one of the following women’s health issues: birth control, abortion, family planning, human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in women, or another issue approved by the course Instructor.
  • Consider the impact of political, social, and sociocultural factors on the women’s health issue you selected.
  • Reflect on how the personal perceptions of providers might influence their ability or willingness to care for women in relation to this issue.

Post at least 250 words APA format (no introduction or conclusion)

1.     pick on subject from above

2.     explain the political impact of this women’s health issue,

3.     social factors of this women’s health issue

4.     sociocultural factors on this women’s health issue

5.     Explain how personal perceptions of providers might influence their ability or willingness to care for women in relation to this issue.

NURS 6551 Week 1 Discussion Resource

Schuiling, K. D., & Likis, F. E. (2013). Women’s gynecologic health (2nd ed.). Burlington, MA: Jones and Bartlett Publishers

Human Papilloma Virus

Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) is transmitted through close intimate contact with another individual carrying the disease and is known as the most common sexually transmitted disease according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). (CDC, 2016).  Unfortunately, this condition can remain asymptomatic permitting the spread of the virus to others (Shuiling & Likis, 2017).  The virus is transmitted via sexual intercourse with a person having infected genitals, oropharynx, as well as anal.  HPV  is found during routine screening with Papanicolaou (PAP) smear which determines abnormal cells present to the cervix (CDC, 2016).  These abnormal cells frequently return to normal over a period of time, however, with some persons these cells may turn into cancer (CDC, 2016).  Unresolved lesions can lead to cancer of the cervix, vagina, penis, anus, and the oropharynx (Sasaki et al., 2017).  Nearly 70% of cervical cancer is caused by HPV 16 and 18 along with HPV 6 and 11 have been determined to cause genital warts and laryngeal papillomatosis (Sasaki et al., 2017).

Political Impact

In 2006 the U. S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the first HPV vaccine to prevent or reduce the incidence of cervical, vaginal, vulvar, penile, anal, and oropharyngeal related cancers (Keim-Malpass et al., 2017).  Unfortunately, the completion of the three-vaccination series lags far behind the Healthy People 2020 goal of 80% of males and females aged 13-15 years of age (Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, 2016).

Social and Sociocultural Factors

According to Rossi, Baldacchini, and Ronco (2014), women from lower socioeconomic status along with others in disadvantaged groups had less knowledge regarding HPV and cervical cancer risks than more affluent women.  Rossi et al. (2014) also found that unvaccinated women are also underscreened for HPV.  Furthermore, Rossi et al. (2014) felt the introduction of the HPV self-testing may increase screening however inequalities continue to exist as the cost is prohibitive with some groups of at-risk women.  Rossi et al. (2014), felt HPV self-screening would increase population coverage, participation, and compliance to preventing disease transmission along with the development of newer technology in self-sampling innovation. Rossi et al. (2014) go on to say in population-based randomized trials have indicated that screening with an HPV test has greater effectiveness than the Pap test in decreasing the incidence of cervical cancer along with mortality.   There are many government-sponsored programs to increase HPV awareness to assist the public in understanding the medical and preventative benefits of utilizing vaccines to prevent cancer. NURS 6551 Week 1 Discussion: Political, Social, and Sociocultural Influences on Women’s Health – Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) Essay

Provider Influence

The conversation between the provider, parent, and adolescent can be tricky.  Clark et al. (2016) found in a national study that communication and support for the HPV vaccine were not consistently recommended due to long and in-depth conversations.  A recent personal experience during a pediatric practicum, the pediatrician, routinely did not routinely recommend the HPV vaccine to adolescents unless it was felt the family and patient exhibited ‘at risk’ behaviors.  To increase the national goal of HPV vaccination, it will be essential to eliminate provider barriers to recommending vaccination in the clinical setting (Warner et al., 2017).

References

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).  (2016).  Human Papillomavirus (HPV).

Retrieved from cdc.gov/hpv/parents/whatishpv.html

Keim-Malpass, J., Mitchell, E. M., DeGuzman, P. B., Stoler, M. H., & Kennedy, C. (2017).

Legislative activity related to the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine in the United States (2006-2015): A need for evidence-based policy.  Risk Managed Healthcare Policy, 10, 29-32. doi: 10.2147/RMHP.S128247 NURS 6551 Week 1 Discussion: Political, Social, and Sociocultural Influences on Women’s Health – Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) Essay

Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion.  (2016).  HPV vaccine, adolescents 2008-

  1. (2016). In Healthy People 2020. Retrieved from https://www.healthypeople.gov/ 2020/topics-objectives/topic/hpv/vaccines.

Rossi, P. G., Baldacchini, F., & Ronco, G. (2014).  The possible effects on socio-economic

inequalities of introducing HPV testing as primary test in cervical cancer screening programs.  Frontiers in Oncology, 4, 20. doi: 10.3389/fronc.2014.00020

Sasaki, Y., Iwanari, O., Arakawa, I., Moriya, T., Mikami, Y., Iihara, K., & Konno, R. (2017).

Cervical cancer screening with human papillomavirus DNA and cytology in Japan.  International Journal of Gynecological Cancer, 27(3), 523-529. doi: 10.1097/IGC. 000000000000000898

Schuiling, K. D., & Likis, F. E. (2017).  Women’s gynecologic health (3rd ed.).  Burlington, MA:

Jones and Bartlett Publishers

Warner, E. L., Ding, Q., Pappas, L., Bodson, J., Fowler, B., Mooney, R., Kirchhoff, A. C., &

Kepka, D. (2017).  Health care providers’ knowledge of HPV vaccination, barriers, and strategies in a state with low HPV vaccine receipt:  Mixed-methods study.  JMIR Caner, 3(2), e12.  doi: 10.2196/cancer.7345 NURS 6551 Week 1 Discussion: Political, Social, and Sociocultural Influences on Women’s Health – Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) Essay

 

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